Prepare Your Car for Winter

Prepare Your Car for The Winter Season

prepare car for winterSometimes breaking down in the summer and spring months isn’t too much of a hassle: especially if the weather is nice. But breaking down in sub-zero temperatures is another story. Prepare your car this winter by following these tips.

Check Your Battery

According to TheAA, the most common cause of breakdown is battery related. And battery related issues are exacerbated in winter months. Because of the cold weather, batteries have lower outputs levels, accept charges at lesser levels, and carry increased loads (lights, heat, wipers, etc.).

To avoid issues in the winter months, TheAA recommends replacing your battery if it is five years or older, especially if your car has trouble starting up. An easy preventative maintenance step you can take to decrease the load on your battery at startup is to turn everything electrical off for the first few seconds when you start your car. Avoid a breakdown this winter by taking care of your battery.

Wipers

Do you remember the last time you bought windshield wipers? If not, it’s probably time to get a new set. You can find wipers made specifically for the winter at your local auto store. These wear down less from ice accumulation and remove ice from your windshield easier than non-winter wipers.

Tires Lose 1 Pound of Pressure per Every 10 Degree Drop

Well, according to TireRack.com, the actual equation is 2% per every 10-degree Fahrenheit drop. But for the average car tire requiring 30-50 psi for adequate inflation, the difference between the summer and winter temperature could lose you at least 5 psi in tire inflation. That difference could end up making your car slide on the snow. Be sure to check your psi periodically in the winter months to ensure your tires are up to the car manual’s specifications.

Car Wash

This might sound strange, but car washes are imperative in the winter months if you drive on roads that are constantly plowed and salted. The salt can cause rust on your car’s frame and break and gas lines.  Car washes will keep your car untouched by the dangers of winter-related rusting.

The winter months don’t only call for a change in attire. But they also demand certain preparations be made to your car. Get your car ready for the winter by following these tips.

Sports Storage

How to Store Sports Equipment

 

sports storageAmericans love sports. From the NFL to the WNBA, the business of sports memorabilia is booming. But we’re not just spectators. We love to play sports too. And, according to science, we have good reason. Health benefits from playing sports in childhood last well into adulthood.

So many homes and apartments are populated by old and new basketballs, scuffed up baseballs, deflategate footballs, tarred bats, and other sporting equipment. Here are some tips for storing your sports equipment.

Evaluate Equipment

The very first thing you should do is take notice of all the sporting equipment you own. How much time has gone by since your last batting practice? Do you see one in the foreseeable future? If not, maybe the bat you taped together should sit in storage anymore. Toss what you won’t use again, and toss what is useless.

Deflategate

It’s time to cause your own Deflategate. Deflate everything that has air in it. Then put it all in a box. Also, if you don’t have one, it’s a good time to purchase a pump. Store it with your deflateables.

Equipment Storage by Type

Tennis racquets require a different type of storage than basketballs. Be sure when you bring your sporting equipment to storage that you have the correct insulators and the correct unit type to store everything.

Conclusion

Sports is a big part of life. When you store your sporting equipment, school yourself on the details of storing it all.

Green Storage Solutions

Green Storage Solutions

green storage solutionsGoing green isn’t only about recycling. It’s also about reusing the things you already own for other purposes. This has been named repurposing. When it comes to moving some things to storage, repurposing some of your older items is a good way to go green.

For instance, if you use crates to move some of your larger objects, you can repurpose them, after storage, as tables or chairs. The wood in the pallet is still good to use, even if you don’t need to use the pallet anymore. If nothing else, create some birdhouses with it. It’s a good project for the family, if nothing else. And it ensures the wood doesn’t just rot in a landfill.

Many people, by default, acquire cardboard boxes to store everything. From books to picture frames, some people can use dozens of boxes. Try using furniture for storage that you already own. Picture frames and books can fit inside dressers. And you can lay out clothes on couches. Or set up a moveable closet to hang pictures. There are a lot of ways to avoid using boxes to store your things.

When you do buy anything for storage, make sure, at the very least, it’s recyclable.  That way, when you don’t need storage anymore, and you don’t have use for the containers, you can put them back to use by recycling.

Storage Hacks

Storage Hacks for Apartment Living

Apartment Storage IdeasEver notice how densely populated areas have tall buildings? It’s because when you run out of horizontal space, you have to think vertically. If you ever lived in a dorm room at college, you’ll understand this principle. Most dorm room roommates position their beds over their desks and dressers. It’s efficient, and it opens the rest of the room for other things (like a table tennis table).

This means lack of closet and storage space doesn’t have to be the last word on your storage capabilities. Here are some hacks for making the most of your apartment space.

Use the Walls

Get some command strips. Hang everything. From your hats and hair ties to your shoes (the trick is to tie them together) and backpacks. You can probably think of more things to hang. You can also buy bags just for the purpose of placing things in them to hang on your wall.

Bed Lifts

If your bed doesn’t sit high off the ground, take a tip from dorm rooms: raise it. You’ll be able to fit a lot more things under there than you might expect: dressers, book shelves, desks. The possibilities are endless. You could even purchase a portable clothes rack and hang your clothes underneath.

Bookshelf Storage

This one is kind of obvious if you keep your bookshelf vertical. But try placing it on its side. Then you can purchase linen baskets and place anything inside of it (like charging cables, papers, extra blankets, and sheets, etc.) without making your room look cluttered. Using linen baskets to create storage blocks in your bookshelf gives you the advantage of storage space without the messy appearance.

Don’t Hang Clothes

You read that right. Instead, go the military way and roll your clothes in their drawers. If rolled correctly, they won’t wrinkle. And you won’t have to dig through your drawers to find the perfect outfit.

If you feel like you don’t have enough space in your apartment, you may not be using the space efficiently. Use these hacks to maximize your apartment space.

Tips for Hiring Movers

Tips for Hiring Movers

tips for hiring moversMoving can be tedious. It can also be fun: when someone else does all the work. Be sure to do a bit of research before you hire movers to protect your stuff.

Moving Policies

If you’re considering hiring movers, it is important to stay informed on their moving policies and practices. Are they liable if your fragile glassware arrives in pieces? It’s also important to know about the business itself. ApartmentHomeLiving.Com provides helpful questions that ensure you or your stuff won’t be left in the dark.

Sign a contract, and make sure all your stuff is protected in it.  Don’t pay a huge deposit, as this is usually indicative of fraud. If you pay off the moving contract before the move is finished, what guarantees the movers will take all your stuff to the new house? According to Moving.com, paying a large deposit could mean you won’t see your stuff again. Also, take a look at Moving.com’s explanation of common insurance packages offered by moving companies.This is an added layer of security for your valuables.

Extra Fees and Move Time

Staying informed can be a chore. An estimate from a professional moving business requires, at times, complicated variables. What must be considered, and what you should ask about, is how long it will take to move your possessions and how will your stuff be handled. Ask about previous experience, and what sort of challenges come with each move. If they have to walk up stairs to move your things, will it cost extra? What about moving things from a side street as opposed from a drive way?

Before you pack up your stuff, you may want to visualize how you will arrange your things before you arrive. Put yourself in the best position by labeling which boxes belong in which rooms. Don’t set unrealistic expectations for your movers. If the new home is a thousand miles away, don’t expect a rush, next-day delivery. And if you do get that rush delivery, you may have moved too fast.

Tips For An Effortless Move

Tips for an Effortless Move

tips for an effortless viewMoving is always an exciting experience. It can be stressful, however, if you don’t prepare. These three tips will help you put your best foot forward on move day.

Packing

Begin packing for your move a few weeks in advance. Pack clothes you won’t wear soon first, a few weeks ahead of the move. Then follow up with rare-use items. Those candles you haven’t lit since last year? Wrap them in your extra towels. Leave day-to-day stuff for the final week before the move. Preparing for your move early ensures a less stressful move-day experience.

Donate or Sell Unwanted Items

When you begin packing, you’ll notice some things you would rather leave behind. This is why it’s important to get a head start. Take all the unwanted stuff to Goodwill or make a few bucks hosting a yard sale. Whatever you do, it’s a good idea to lighten your load. Fewer boxes mean fewer things to move. And it also means more space for new stuff in your new home!

Label Boxes and Pair Items

As you look around at all the glassware you own, don’t worry about getting newspapers or bubble wrap to pack with. Use things you already have handy and need to store anyway. For instance, clean sheets, blankets, towels, and clothes work just as well to create layers of separation between glassware. There’s no need to get fancy.
And while you’re putting that all-purpose cleaner and dish detergent into boxes, be sure to label them appropriately. Then you won’t have your friends asking every few seconds, “Where does this go?” The less you need to explain when you get to your new home the less time it will take to setup your living room and watch Netflix.

Cleaning

Move-out Day Cleaning

blogEveryone wants to get the most back from their deposit. That’s what making the most of Move-out Day means. It means cleaning those areas you usually wouldn’t and doing maintenance on spots you’d usually let go. The following will help you get the most back from your deposit.

Carpet

This is a huge part of preparing your apartment for move-out. If you’ve ever lived on a laminate or hardwood floor, you know how much dirt you can track around your house. But when you have carpets, sometimes the dirt is hidden, especially if the carpet is thick.

If you haven’t used a carpet cleaner on your carpet yet, now is the time. You might be surprised how much dirt your carpet hides.

Damage

Light switch covers, doors knobs, drawer handles, door stops, blinds: all are commonly used or commonly damaged items in your apartment. If you wouldn’t like the state any of these are in when you move into your new apartment, then it’s probably a good idea for you to replace or fix them.

Small holes

If you don’t use adhesive strips to hang your pictures and posters, chances are your apartment is riddled with small nail holes. But this is an easy fix. Simply purchase a putty knife and spackle or wall joint compound. Spread the spackle or wall joint compound over the hole(s). When it dries, sand it to match the depth of the wall. Repeat if necessary.